No White After Labor Day?

 

 

                   Today is the first Monday in September, also known as Labor Day. Labor Day became a federal holiday late in the 1800’s-recognizing the working class.

                Each year I hear the eminent, “you can’t wear white after Labor Day.” As I mull over this statement each year, I find myself in conversations with friends and family asking, “Who created this rule, why, and when does this rule expire”?  I have yet to find a person capable of giving me a solid answer, but I can say I have come across a number of very interesting sentiments.

                This year, I took it upon myself to do a little research. It appears there are many assumptions to who created this rule, why it was created, and when it expires. I have listed two of the most logical answers below.

·         The time of season: Labor Day is the dividing line between summer and fall. When an individual wears white in the summer, it reflects the sun – allowing one to stay cool. Opposed to fall, wearing dark colors is recommended to attract the sun, allowing one to stay warm during the rain and snow seasons.

·         High society fashion statement from the rich in history: It was noted during the Glided Age, an era of rapid economic growth to distinguish between the rich and poor. Only the rich could afford to change their clothes during the year, allowing this rule to become fashion statement established by the “in” crowd. The rich wore white while the poor wore dingy, darker, and faded colors.  Wearing white into the fall season-other than a white wedding dress- was also considered edgy and unexpected.

                I also found conflicting testimonies as to when this rule expires. I have listed the most logical proclamations below for you:

·         After Memorial Day;

·         It depends on the fabric; and

·         The day after Easter

                In my opinion, the imperative of not wearing white after Labor Day has diminished and are only upheld by the conventions of ones’ tradition, fashion and personal decree. What is your opinion on the matter? Regardless to my research, I find myself eager to understand how others deem the subject.